After some time I realized I wanted to protect my kibana dashboard using a password. I did a similar setup with my splunk setup, where I used apache’s reverse proxy capability to password protect the application (the setup is covered here).

Reverse Proxy with a Dedicated VirtualHost

This setup is covered here. I ended up creating the following configuration:

┌─[elatov@kerch] - [/home/elatov] - [2016-02-07 09:29:16]
└─[0] <> cat /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/40-www.conf
<IfModule mod_nss.c>
<VirtualHost 10.0.0.2:8443>
	ServerName www.moxz.tk
	## Vhost docroot
	DocumentRoot "/var/www"
	
	### TLS
	NSSEngine on
	NSSNickname www-cert
	NSSCertificateDatabase /etc/apache2/nssdb
	
	# Logging
	CustomLog "/var/log/apache2/web-moxz-tk-8443-access.log" combined
    ErrorLog "/var/log/apache2/web-moxz-tk-8443-error.log"
    LogLevel warn
	
	# proxy
	ProxyRequests Off

	ProxyPass / http://10.0.0.6:5601/
    ProxyPassReverse / https://10.0.0.6:5601/
	<Proxy *>
		## Auth
		AuthType Basic
		AuthName "Kibana"
		AuthUserFile /etc/apache2/pass/htpasswd
		Require valid-user
	</Proxy>
</VirtualHost>
</IfModule>

This is actually doing SSL Offloading as well so it’s pretty sweet. I covered my mod_nss setup here.

Reverse Proxy with a Dedicated ServerPath/Directory

If you already have a website running and you don’t want to waste virtualhosts you can setup kibana to be on a specific server path and you can just reverse proxy that path/directory. This is covered here. First enable kibana to have a specific BasePath (don’t forget to restart kibana):

┌─[elatov@puppet] - [/home/elatov] - [2016-02-07 09:36:06]
└─[0] <> grep server.basePath /opt/kibana/config/kibana.yml
server.basePath: "/kibana"

Then modify you apache config to look like this:

┌─[elatov@kerch] - [/home/elatov] - [2016-02-07 09:29:27]
└─[0] <> cat /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/35-www.conf
<IfModule mod_nss.c>
<VirtualHost 10.0.0.2:443>
	ServerName www.moxz.tk:443
	## Vhost docroot
	DocumentRoot "/var/www"
	# TLS
	NSSEngine on
	NSSNickname www-cert
	NSSCertificateDatabase /etc/apache2/nssdb
	
	# Logging
	CustomLog "/var/log/apache2/www-moxz-tk-443-access.log" combined
	ErrorLog "/var/log/apache2/www-moxz-tk-443-error.log"
	LogLevel warn
    
    	# Proxy
	<Location /kibana>
		## Auth
		AuthType Basic
		AuthName "Kibana"
		AuthUserFile /etc/apache2/pass/htpasswd
		Require valid-user
		### Reverse Proxy
		ProxyPass         http://10.0.0.6:5601 retry=0
  		ProxyPassReverse  http://10.0.0.6:5601
	</Location>
</VirtualHost>

The only downside of the BasePath directive is after that’s set you actually can’t go directly to the kibana app. I think this is a bug and there is a discussion on it here. Hopefully in the next release it will be fixed.

Reverse Proxy without Kibana BasePath

If you don’t setup the basePath you will have to reverse proxy a bunch of locations. The gist of them are covered here. You would need this (I tried it out and was actually okay):

ProxyRequests Off

ProxyPass /app/kibana http://127.0.0.1:5601/app/kibana
ProxyPassReverse /app/kibana http://127.0.0.1:5601/app/kibana

ProxyPass /bundles http://127.0.0.1:5601/bundles
ProxyPassReverse /bundles http://127.0.0.1:5601/bundles
  
ProxyPass /status http://127.0.0.1:5601/status
ProxyPassReverse /status http://127.0.0.1:5601/status

ProxyPass /api/status http://127.0.0.1:5601/api/status
ProxyPassReverse /api/status http://127.0.0.1:5601/api/status

ProxyPass /elasticsearch http://127.0.0.1:5601/elasticsearch
ProxyPassReverse /elasticsearch http://127.0.0.1:5601/elasticsearch

And you would also need to go directly to the full url (https://apache.server/app/kibana)


Published by Karim Elatov

26 May 2016

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